Filling a Big Gap

I’m walking into the garden center at Home Depot and the first thing I see is 2 long rows of pots and planters in dozens of different styles and sizes. Everything from small plastic containers to beautifully glazed 50 gallon planters. These hundreds of plant containers are bought by nearly as many people for their home growing each month.

And they are planting more than just flowers. At an increasing rate, people are growing their own herbs and small vegetables, according to the latest National Gardening Survey. This survey supports other reports indicating that nearly 20 million Americans have active indoor or outdoor container gardens, including as many as 3 million who are trying some type of hydroponics.

Unfortunately, these surveys do not address how or if the outdoor container-grown plants are protected from the elements, i.e. storms, wind, bugs, etc.  You can buy a small greenhouse at Home Depot but it will probably not fit on a typical balcony, or be appropriate for a terrace, deck or rooftop.

I assume you are familiar with greenhouses – specialized structures with glass walls (typically now clear plastic panels) designed to let in as much sunlight as possible and then hold in heat when needed or vent the heat during warm weather. To a great extent, a greenhouse is a managed environment for growing all kinds of plants and one of the oldest forms of controlled environment agriculture (CEA).

However, the environment in a greenhouse is not necessarily completely controlled unless it also has air conditioning, supplementary heat, artificial sunlight (grow lights), circulation fans, and humidity control. Most serious commercial greenhouses have these features where and when they are necessary. Going even further with CEA, hydroponics techniques control growth media as well by replacing soil with very specific exposure to air and nutrient-rich water. All of these concepts have found their way into technologies available to individual consumers as well as commercial markets.

Commercial farmers also have use for very simple plastic film coverings with no additional environment control. This is often referred to as “modified environment agriculture” (MEA) since they have a limited effect on light, temperature, and humidity. Some overlap exists between what is considered CEA and what gets called MEA, so a bit of latitude in terminology may be in order when talking about a plant enclosure that incorporates partial control of its environment.

 

Now, looking at these two industries – home gardening and commercial CEA/MEA – what is missing is a controlled-environment outdoor plant enclosure small enough to fit on a balcony, yet also expandable to help commercial growers who want a compact version of their CEA greenhouses for starting plants and enhancing low-profile plant growth. This could be seen as a niche market, but a pretty big niche that includes:

  • Home growers in cities, suburbs, and even rural areas
  • Restaurants and grocery stores capable of growing their own produce and herbs on their rooftops or terraces
  • Micro-farmers and urban farmers
  • Specialty and research farms
  • Schools, hospitals, and other facilities where people pay attention to food quality and education

At Ponix MicroAg, our goal is to become a major CEA resource for all of these people and businesses as we bring pPod compact enclosures and complementary products and services to these markets in the near future.

To learn more about Ponix MicroAg, our initial design, the pPod, and other developments we are working on, visit our website at www.pponix.com .

Thanks for checking in!

Chris